us brides of Christ JESUS

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-m9sRRN9MA

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “us brides of Christ JESUS

  1. SAVED LIKE THE PARALYTIC?-BY STEVE FINNELL

    The proponents of “FAITH ONLY” salvation like to present the paralytic as an example of one who had his sins forgiven without being baptized in water. Their position is, since Jesus forgave the paralytic without being immersed in water; so then, baptism is not essential, for those living today, in order to have sins forgiven.

    PARALYTIC SALVATION: Luke 5:18-20 And some men were carrying on a bed a man who was paralyzed; and they were trying to bring him in and set him him down in front of Him. 19 But not finding any way to bring him in because of the crowd, they went up on the roof and let him down through the tiles with his stretcher, into the middle of the crowd, in front of Jesus . 20 Seeing their faith , He said , “Friend, your sins are forgiven.”

    PARALYTIC SALVATION: Jesus forgave his sin because of the faith of friends.

    Can men today be saved like the paralytic? No, they cannot!

    The paralytic was saved without FAITH.
    The paralytic was saved without REPENTANCE.
    The paralytic was saved without CONFESSING Jesus as the Son of God.
    The paralytic was saved without being BAPTIZED.
    The paralytic was saved without BELIEVING that God raised Jesus from the dead.
    The paralytic was saved without CONFESSING Jesus as Lord and Christ.

    THE PARALYTIC PLAN OF SALVATION WAS- THE FAITH OF FRIENDS.

    The paralytic was saved before the New Covenant was in force. Jesus had to die before the New Covenant was available.

    Men today have to meet the terms of the New Agreement, that is the New Covenant.

    NEW COVENANT: Hebrews 9:15-17 For this reason He is the mediator of a new covenant, so that, since a death has taken place for the redemption of the transgressions that were committed under the first covenant, those who have been called may receive the promise of eternal inheritance. 16 For were a covenant is, there must of necessity be the death of the one made it. 17 For a covenant is valid only when men are dead, for it is never in force while the one who lives made it.

    The apostle Peter told all men how to be saved under the New Covenant. (Acts 2:22-41) A.D. 33 The Day of Pentecost.

    New Covenant terms of pardon.
    FAITH: John 3:16
    REPENTANCE: Acts 2:38, Acts 3:19, Luke 24:47
    CONFESSION: Romans 10:9-10, Acts 8:37
    BAPTISM: Acts 2:38, Mark 16:16, 1 Peter 3:21, Acts 22:16, Colossians 2:12-13, Titus 3:5, John 3:5, Galatians 3:27, Romans 6:3-7

    Was the paralytic saved? Yes, so was the thief on the cross, Enoch, Abraham, and many others before the New Covenant was in force, however, it was the blood of Jesus that washed away the sins of those who died under the Old Covenant.

    IF MEN TODAY CAN HAVE THEIR SIN FORGIVEN LIKE THE PARALYTIC—–THEN THEY CAN BE SAVED WITHOUT FAITH IN JESUS CHRIST. THE PARALYTIC WAS SAVED BECAUSE OF THE FAITH OF FRIENDS!

    YOU ARE INVITED TO FOLLOW MY BLOG. http://steve-finnell.blogspot.com

    1. From my Logos Bible in one of today’s devotionals

      ‘2:10. This verse presents an interpretive problem due to the awkward change of addressee in the verse’s middle. Jesus seemed to be addressing the scribes (v. 10a) but there is an abrupt break in the verse after which He addressed the paralytic. Another problem in light of the overall emphasis of Mark is the public use of the title Son of Man by Jesus in the presence of unbelieving hearers so early in His ministry (cf. 9:9; 10:33). Apart from 2:10 and 28, this title does not occur in Mark’s account until after Peter’s confession (8:29). After that it occurs 12 times and is crucial to Jesus’ self-disclosure to His disciples (cf. 8:31, 38; 9:9, 12, 31; 10:33, 45; 13:26; 14:21 [twice], 41, 62; see comments on 8:31).
      In light of these difficulties 2:10a is probably a parenthetical, editorial comment by Mark (cf. similarly, vv. 15c, 28; 7:3–4, 19; 13:14). He inserted it into the narrative to explain the significance of this event for his readers: that Jesus as the risen Son of Man has authority (exousian, the right and power) on earth to forgive sins, something the scribes did not fully recognize. Only here in the Gospels is the forgiveness of sins attributed to the Son of Man.
      This view contributes to the literary unity of the passage: forgiveness is declared (2:5), questioned (vv. 6–9), validated (v. 11), and recognized (v. 12). The initial words in verse 10, But that you may know, could thus be translated, “Now you (Mark’s readers) should know that.…” The last clause signals the end of Mark’s comment and a return to the incident itself.
      2:11–12. Jesus commanded the paralytic to get up (a test of his faith), take his mat, and go home (demand of obedience). The man was enabled to do this immediately (euthys; cf. 1:10) in full view of them all, including Jesus’ critics. They were forced to recognize that the man had received God’s forgiveness. This showed the character of salvation Jesus brought, namely, healing whole persons. Everyone (probably including the scribes) was amazed (existasthai, lit., “out of their minds”; cf. 3:21; 5:42; 6:51) and praised (ascribed glory to) God because of Jesus’ display of supernatural power.

      Grassmick, J. D. (1985). Mark. In J. F. Walvoord & R. B. Zuck (Eds.), The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures (Vol. 2, pp. 112–113). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s